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20121006
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Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
with countries around the world in deeper trade, investment in science and technology, development, all efforts that can spark economic growth for all of our people. such efforts depend on a spirit of mutual interest and mutual respect. no government or company, no school will be confident working in a country where its people are endangered. four partnerships to be affective, our citizens must be secured and our efforts must be welcomed. a politics based only on anger, one based on dividing the world between us and them, if it ultimately undermines those who tolerate it. all of us have an interest in standing up to those forces. let us remember that muslims have suffered the most at the hands of extremism. on the same day our civilians were killed and in benghazi a turkish police officer was killed days before his wedding. several afghan children were more by their parents just days after they were killed by a suicide bomber in kabul. it may initially be focused on the west, but over time it cannot be contained. the same impulses of extremism is used to justify war between tribes and clans. it
their heads thinking there is no way this could possibly work. the practices have no basis in science or medicine and they will now be relegated to the dust bin of quackery, your governor, david, is calling what you do quackery. can you just react to that and tell me how this new law will affect what you do? >> yes. let me tell you what kind of governor we have now. so, for instance, if a child is -- let me tell you first, any good competent therapist knows that homosexual feelings can result when one -- i'm talking about boys now, when one is raped or sexually molested. later in life, those feelings come up. what our governor decided now he knows best that the kind of profound affective therapy is quackery, that handles this kind of situation. >> david, how about the american psychiatric -- forgive me, i'll add on to the governor, the american psychiatric association says the potential risk of reparative therapy is great including depression, anxiety, self-destructive behavior, reparative therapy, this is the truth wins out, reparative therapy is junk science winning out by religious
are failing us. a bill to expand the green cards allotted to foreign students in stem field, science, technology, engineering, mathematics, was voted down in congress. on a recent prime time special on cnn, "fixing immigration," i pointed out that canada and australia now have larger foreign-born populations than the united states. both of those countries revamped their immigration systems to attract and keep the best and brightest foreigners, but we're closing the door to many of the smartest potential entrepreneurs in the world. if we want job creators, let's stop kicking them out of the country. >>> when we come back, mahmoud ahmadinejad apologizes to new yorkers. more of my interview with the president of iran. ♪ so, i'm working on a cistern intake valve, and the guy hands me a locknut wrench. no way! i'm like, what is this, a drainpipe slipknot? wherever your business takes you, nobody keeps you on the road like progressive commercial auto. [ flo speaking japanese ] [ shouting in japanese ] we work wherever you work. now, that's progressive. call or click today. >>> president
. >>shepard: doctor, never thought about that one. >> that's science for you. >>shepard: everything will be harmful soon. thank you, doctor. >> the man behind brian griffin will host the biggest event in all of hollywood, and now a new gig hosting the oscars. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it mahelp lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it could save you thousands in ou
correct, then that does slide into the -- that does slide from simply being bad science to something more sinister. it's not realistic to think that the 2000 will voter turnout model is valid in 2012. if they are in fact doing that and if i know it they know that it's not a good model. then you do have to wonder if pat caddell is on to something. again, i'm not a conspiracy time of guy so i'm not saying it's rigged. but if they are using a bad model and then they not only do polls, bill, then they write about their own polls and it creates an impression that it's time to write the owe -- obituary for mitt romney. >> bill: there is no that investigates the press because we have freedoms. >> it's the media that should investigate it i'm not holding my breath. >> bill: good luck with that. >> this would be the same media that's doing a lot of the polling. if they are doing the polling. >> bill: people are so distracted they don't remember three days ago what happened. this is what the media banks on. we can make a mistake, nobody is going to remember. we'll just wipe it off the blackboard an
science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacyn the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: israel's prime minter warned again today that iran iwelln its way to creating a nuclear weapon and said the world needs to act. benjamin netanyahu spoke at the united nations. as he has often before, netanyahu condemned iran and its nuclear program, and called on other leaders to do the same. >> at stake is not merely the future of my country. at stake is the future of the world. and nothing could imperil our common future more than the arming of iran with nuclear weapons. >> woodruff: the israeli prime minister said the hour is, quote, "getting late" to stop iran as it continues its nuclear work. >> i speak about it now because the iranian nuclear calendar doesn't take time out for anyone or for anything. i speak about it now because when it comes t
holding businesses responsible. >> in the light jacket. >> hi, i co-chaired the defense science energy security task force with jim schlesinger and i currently just been named the technical cochairman of the chief of naval operations vulnerability on energy security and i would like to talk about, first of i like to take the opportunity say that, the states and ferc on electricity and energy regulation, the states regulate almost exclusively for rate, rates, not for reliability at all. and ferc regulations are, they can take effect after a process that takes four to six years. in light of the rate of threat which is something else i wanted to talk about, we have no effective regulatory system. so i'm particularly concerned about sif and particularly concerned about cyber and i, i would like to call into question the perishability of cyber solutions. the lot of the discussion today, which i completely agree with all of it, focused on the cyber solutions to the cyber problems but i would like to point out that because of the rate of the threat, particularly with the bad actors, we might
. dante scala is a professor of political science at the university of new hampshire, and "the washington post" deputy political editor, anne kornblut stuck around too. dante, you're on the ground there in the granite state. you're very familiar with that electorate. latest nbc news/marist poll, likely voters, president obama 51%, mitt romney 44%. what's the likelihood that the governor is able to close that gap between now and the first tuesday in november? >> i think it's going to take, craig, a national rebound for mitt romney to make it competitive here in new hampshire. there's no evidence that despite the fact that governor romney has campaigned in new hampshire off and on, really for most of the past decade, there's no evidence that he owns any kind of specific backyard advantage here in this new england state. his favorables to unfavorables are -- his unfavorables outweigh his favorables here in the state, which is striking given the amount of time he spent campaigning here. so new hampshire really is behaving the way it did four years ago, as a democratic-leaning bellwether state
the most government funded research to push the boundaries of science and technology so our best innovators and the entrepreneurs could pluck them and start these companies. if you think about that is a formula for success, and education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming out of high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers we are now $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration we have a policy to get a great education and then get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h-1b issues that are so vital for our future strength. fourth, the rules for incentivizing risk-taking and preventing recklessness. i don't think that we have in any way remedied that the way we want and on the government funded research if it looks like an ekg heading for a heart attack. i don't know if they are relative to what. all i know is in the things that have historically made us great, on each one of those i see us not g
proposals. i'm asking -- >> 100,000 new math and science teachers. we need that. >> that's a goal, right? >> educating training 2 million new workers in our community colleges in conjunction with business to fill jobs that are open right now. boosting american manufacturing by ending the tax break that sends jobs overseas and giving tax incentives to companies that start manufacturing businesses here. these are specific tangible proposals and i believe they will pass because i believe the american people are supportive of that. >> but they haven't passed. >> the verdict will be rendered november 6. megyn: joining me now mark hannah, former aid to john kerry and barack obama. kevin, your chots on that exchange? >> that was a revealing look inside the best talking points that president obama has by his top spokesperson on the campaign frame beside himself. if you can't get more prekay tough than education, green energy, research and development, and that's the solutions? those are the pin points for solutions you are offering for an election that's going to be decided on an economy and job
of the college of arts and sciences at the university of southern california, an expert on biological clocks. good morning. >> good morning. how are you? >> i am good. i must say that your most creative at 9 p.m. was most surprising to me. by 9 p.m. i am exhausted. >> yes. what we're learning from research over the last few years is really our bodies are an orchestra of different biological rhythms coordinated by a central clock in the brain. we're able to perform different tachks optimally at different times of the take. the creative aspect of the 9 p.m. comes from a combination of being a little bit sleepy and what research has shown us is that kind of state enables us to be more creative and less held down by our common worries of the day. >> interesting. why is it best to have a difficult conversation in the morning? >> that i think comes from research that shows us that we have quite strong 24 hour rhythms in our cognitive abilities to our abilities to perform computation, complex tasks, all of that tends to start to peak from the middle of the morning through to the middle of the after
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> 23 past the hour your fox news minute. a man behind the anti islamic video that sparked deadly protests in the middle east is behind bars in los angeles. he told a judge his remain as martin yusef. he was convicted of check fraud violation. he was a flight risk. following a protest against austerity measures in spain and greece marchers took to the streets in italy causing the closure of the area. two large unions led a march of 30,000 people that clogged streets and snarled traffic during morning rush hour and the real nfl referees went back last night now that the lock over is over. the officials returns to the field for the game between the baltimore ravens and the cleveland browns and were greeted by a standing ovation from plans -- fans. cheryl: halfway through the game they went back to yelling but that is another story. thank you very much. the federal reserve making its first data dumped on discount window rending under dodd-frank. rich eds
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [oinking] [hissing] [ding] announcer: cook foods to the right temperature using a food thermometer. 3,000 americans will die from food poisoning this year. check your steps at foodsafety.gov. >> we have a big name stock with a new high. ibm. and why is this happening, nicole? >> well, stuart, i was just taking a look at ibm. and taking a look at the price target raised to 240 from 225 over at deutche bank. it's interesting, and now listen to a record intraday here for ibm. this dow component is up nearly 2% today and just talking about the expectations of the refreshed main frame and power plus server, and talking about this, and why they're raising the price target and saying the stock is attractively valued. a new high here for ibm today. 211.27 was the high. >> it's up 12% this year, not bad at all. nicole, thank you very much indeed. dr. ben carson one of the world's best neurosurgeons, if he were 21, 20 years old would he still go to medical school? he joins us from johns hopkins, author of "ameri
paths tried by abraham and jacob. we blaze new trails in science, technology, medicine, agriculture. in israel, the past and the future find common ground. unfortunately, that is not the case in many other countries. today, a great battle is being waged between the modern and the medieval. the forces of maternity seek a bright future -- modernity seek a bright future in which the rights of everyone is protected. in which every life is sacred. the forces of medievalism seek a world in which women and minorities are it segregated and knowledge is suppressed and in which not life, but death is glorified. nowhere more starkly than in the middle east. israel stands proudly with the forces of modernity. we protect the rights of all of our citizens, men and women, jews and arabs, muslims and christians, all are equal before the law. our scientists when noble prizes -- win nobel prizes. we prevent hunger by irrigating land in africa and asia. recently i was deeply moved when i visited one of our technological institutes. i saw a man paralyzed from the waist down climb up a flight of stairs
and self- discovery. >>> some san francisco residents can visit the california academy of sciences for free this weekend. it is all part of the neighborhood free days which is every friday through sunday through the end of october. people living in the zip codes there on your screen can enter for free this weekend. all you have to do is bring your photo i.d., each adult can bring up to six children. >>> more than 2000 soccer balls will be flying in the air at candlestick today. america scores, a local youth soccer group, will gather to try and break the guinness world record for the most soccer balls dribbled at one time. last year the st. louis chapter made history when 428 soccer players came together, but the united nations has since defeated that record with more than 2000 dribblers in the gaza strip. they will be at the stick at 1:00. >>> the petaluma little league team will enjoy a whole new adventure this afternoon. since advancing to the little league world series, the players took part in a town parade and honored by both the giants and a's. now the team will swim with dolphins at
and how are we thinking about the new development science research as relates to first, second, third grade in all the way up to young adulthood. are we understand their capacity to learn and army harnessing that? our would like to give three examples of where icing canada to well to be making a stronger case and are not. where when i hear the debates, i say they miss it again. how could they not make this connection? the first one for me -- improving conditions and job opportunities for the middle class. when candidates are talking about middle-class families, they have in their mind a picture of a family with children. who is taking care of those children with their parents are working? arledge child-care professionals with them able to provide those learning opportunities in terms of of lawmen them to explore their world -- of allowing them to explore their world, helping them build upon a curiosity. do they have the training they need to do that? are the introducing them to art, music, movement, math skills, storytelling, and the other opportunities that enable them to develop the
. >> brian: our science is not skewed. >> gretchen: president obama up five points. >> they are over polling. >> gretchen: over all president obama is up in the fox news poll. but when you break it down. this is an important question. this would be who gets out of bed. the choice for president in extremely interested voters and people who are extremely motivate get up and get out of the pajamas. 56 percent obama-boid bide and 49 percent rom no, ryan. >> brian: there is no rule to show you cane vote in pajamas. cath rein sebilluous said vote for my guy. the problem is you are not suppose tod do that because you are a cabinet secretary. show broke the law by giving that speech and endorsing her boss president obama. she learned her lesson i am sure? >> gretchen: this weekend back on the cam campaign trail and attending in permanent capacity and i wonder if people will be listening to see if she endorses anybody on the campaign trail. >> brian: they can. but they have to say it is it a campaign even. remember when president obama said we shouldn't do super pacs and then flip flopped . he kent k
. and now we've got to do mor by hiring 100,000 new math and science teachers. by making sure that we're providing millions of new slots for folks to retrain at community colleges for the jobs that exist right now. continue to lower tuition costs for students so they're not loaded up with debt once they graduate. my opponent thinks that it makes sense for us to gut our investment in education in order to give a tax break to the wealthy. i disagree. i think what the united states of america means is that no child should be deprived of a good education. it means that no family should have to set aside a college acceptance letter just because they don't have the money. and no employer should have to look for workers with the right skills in china instead of the united states of america. i want us to focus on education. that's what we've been doing. that's what we're going to keep on doing in a second term when i'm president of the united states. >> all right. so you get a flavor of what the president's saying at a fundraiser. he's doing a few of these fundraisers here in washington today
to lead us in an all- out search to advance our education, our learning, and our science and training, because this world is more complex and we're being pressed harder all the time. i believe in opening doors. we won the olympics, in part, because we've had civil rights laws and the laws that prohibit discrimination against women. i have been for those efforts all my life. the president's record is quite different. the question is our future. president kennedy once said in response to similar arguments, "we are great, but we can be greater.'' we can be better if we face our future, rejoice in our strengths, face our problems, and by solving them, build a better society for our children. thank you. >> thank you, mr. mondale. [applause] please, we have not finished quite yet. thank you, mr. mondale, and thank you, mr. president. and our thanks to our panel members, as well. and so we bring to a close this first of the league of women voters presidential debates of 1984. you two can go at each again in the final league debate on october 21st, in kansas city, missouri. and this thursday
moderator. jenna: like him on that. gregg: let's recruit him. sounds like something out of science fiction but scientists say they developed medical devices that dissolve safely inside the body. we'll have that story coming up or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. jenna: some very interesting medical news for you. scientists say they have developed medical devices that do the work they're designed for on side your body and then, just dissolve. what happens to them? that is the question we have for dr. ernest patty, senior attending physician at st. barna bass hospital in the bronx. doctor, what are we talking about here? medical devices that dissolve, come on. >> small electronic devices. call them transient electronics made out of silicon and magnesium. they're covered in a silk cocoon. they use the silk because the silk is absorbed by the body as well as silicon and magnesium. jenna: what is scenario where someone may have a medical device you're describing? >> th
the subjectivity out of it and you put science around it. so it gives you a benchmark for the products that you have. so when we start looking at that, what we did was we said okay, what are some other alternatives? how can we horne into this as -- honey into this -- hone into this aspect of this particular product. we looked at things from the food industry, for instance. when we did that we came up with the clean stem fluid which is sourced as you said entirely from the fluid industry. what that did by developing those right off the bat, we had two or three orders magnitude stepdown in the numbers. >> numbers of what? >> it's a relative ranking. if you look at one product just in round numbers, let's say it's got an 800, which is what we have been using, some are down to 300 this. >> in terms of what? >> the effects of health, safety and environmental standpoint. >> researching and developing the new recipes for fracking is very expensive. tens of millions of dollars i imagine. >> yes, sir. >> the company believes the existing process, the ones they have been using for years is safe. why is h
of science fiction. but it is quite, quite real. take a look at this. this is an ear that doctors at johns hopkins grew on the arm of a cancer patient. an ear growing on an arm. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us now live from atlanta. elizabeth, we've been looking at this picture all morning. explain it to me. what's going on here? >> john, i don't know if you saw it, i went like this, still even though i've seen it so many times. it's such an eye-popping image. what's going on here is that a woman named sherry walter had cancer, skin cancer on her ear, and they needed to remove almost all of her outer ear. plus some of the structures that were inside because the cancer had spread. and so what they did was they thought, wow, i wonder if we could grow her an ear. they took some cartilage from her ribs and fashioned it into the shape of an ear, but this doesn't look like the real ear, it needed skin. so they put the cartilage that was shaped into an ear under her arm and they waited four months. the skin grew over it. they took it out, and they put it on her head and she
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> you're entitled as a president to your own airplane and your own house but not your own facts. >> that might have been one of the rehearsed zingers from mitt romney we've been hearing about. meanwhile, the president fought back with a little bit of sarcasm. >> at some point, i think the american people have to ask themselves, is the reason that governor romney is keeping all these plans to replace secret because they're too good? >> this morning, a brand-new cnn poll tells us who came out on top. >> welcome back to "early start," everyone. i'm john berman. >> and i'm zoraida sambolin. 31 minutes past the hour here. >>> after countless attacks on the trail, president obama and republican challenger mitt romney finally met face to face. and? you look at cnn's polling, viewers thought the winner was crystal clear. >> 67% of debate watchers surveyed thought romney won, hands down. so i want to bring in richard so socrat socrates, and our own da
. there's no science to that, but when you see the explosion of smart phones they think they could be related. >> clayton: drowning deaths in fact, many parents busy at the pool, and not paying attention, deaths due to drowning and detrimental to see the kids on the smart phone when are' not with them and present, and psychologically. >> alisyn: that part is true, i try to put it away at home and at home, but our playground, oh. >> dave: well, hopefully you're not all-- give us good stories of times you may have been buried in the phone, not grim things, but something silly may have happened, a bump and a bruise, something like that e we'll talk about it later on the show. >> alisyn: to your headlines because new hope for families of victims of 9/11. the new york post reports the city forensic scientists will use a new tool to try to identify new remains, can take dna from bone fragments and identify person's eye and skin color. that's incredible. right now can only determine the sex. 1,120 remains still have not been identified. experts hope that soon they will be able to narrow d
at science history, cyber world, popular culture and computer networking in politics. live at noon eastern on book tv on c-span2. >> next a symposium on partisan politics and compromise. this hour and a half event is hosted by the university of southern california schwarzenegger's institute for state and global policy. panelists include senator john mccain and former senator tom daschle. >> we all breathe the same air. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the chairman of the institute and the inaugural holder of the governor downey chair professor of state and global policy at u.s.e., governor arnold schwarzenegger. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you very much. thank you very much for the fantastic introduction. that's exactly the way i wrote it. [laughter] also thank you very much for your great partnership. one thing i wanted to correct what you said today is i did not win miss universe. different bikinis, waxing, all of those things i did not win that competition. it's mr. universe. anyway, i want to say how enthusiastic i am about being in partnership with u.s.c. the preside
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)

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